Notes


Matches 101 to 150 of 316

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101 He was a hovråd, and licentförvaltareRetzius, Magnus (I20267)
 
102 He was a kamrerRetz, Johan (I20218)
 
103 He was a Karduansmakare in Stockholm. Huus, Joakim (I7627)
 
104 He was a komministerKrönberg, Per (I20229)
 
105 He was a kronolänsmanFrancke, Måns (I20309)
 
106 He was a kyrkoherde. Canuti, Petrus (I20357)
 
107 He was a kyrkoherde (rector).

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

He was a kyrkoherde
Retzius, Ericus (I3788)
 
108 He was a kyrkoherdeRetzius, Benjamin (I20211)
 
109 He was a kyrkoherdeRetzius, Bengt (I20241)
 
110 He was a kyrkoherdeWigius, Olof (I20272)
 
111 He was a kyrkoherdeTranander, Erik (I20287)
 
112 He was a kyrkoherdeSkiärping, Birgerus (I20356)
 
113 He was a kyrkoherdeClarevallensis, Olaus Simonis (I20365)
 
114 He was a kyrkoherdeHornérus, Andreas Emundi (I20370)
 
115 He was a kyrkoherde. (vicar) in Tryserum and Hännas, and hofpredikant hos Nils Gyllenstierna. The surname Retzius was taken from the lake Ressen, near to the Odensvi parish vicarage in Västervik. Retzius, Nikolaus Benedicti (I3780)
 
116 He was a mönsterskrivare,and rusthållareHinsing, Johan (I20389)
 
117 He was a rådmanMatsson, Gustaf (I20274)
 
118 He was a rusthållare and befallningsman (sheriff). Hasselbom, Erik (I12530)
 
119 He was a rusthållare, and skrivarePålsson, Nils (I20407)
 
120 He was a rusthållarePålsson, Jonas (I12528)
 
121 He was a rusthållareEklöf, Hans Alexandersson (I20179)
 
122 He was a rusthållaren at Tingetorp, and a lieutenant (löjtnanten) and later captain (ryttmästare) in the Östergöta Cavalry Regiment.

Nils var löjtnant vid kavalleriet men också rusthållare i Tingetorp och är nämnd i olika handlingar både under sin levnad och efter sin död.

1658 skänkte han en klocka till Tryserums kyrka.
1663 nämnd som kvartersmästare Nils Nilsson i Tingetorp.
1666 förekommer han i mtl som ryttare för Tingetorp.
1676 sålde tillsammans med syskonen 4/5:delar i halva skattehemmanet Skinnebo, Tryserum till svågern Olaus Wigius.
1699 uppvisades i Tjust hd en skrift av Bengt Jöransson i Åsvik, där Bengt med sin syster Anna tillstår att löjtnanten, deras farbror varit deras förmyndare.
1755 lämnar Anders Gran, bosatt på Tingetorps ägor sitt vittnesmål vid Tjust häradsrätt och berättar följande om Nils: "Nils Nilsson Trybom var den första som uppsatte rustning för Tingetorp".

Nils was imprisoned in the castle of Vadstena around 1700 because he incited the bourgeoisie against Charles XII's removal of soldiers and that they would be supplied by the city Soderkoping while they waited to be sent to war. He was one of several who had to sit on the "fortress" a time for this tiltagh, written in an article in Norrköping Newspapers unjäfär 1987. 
Trybom, Nils (I12416)
 
123 He was a rusthållereHansson, Anders (I657)
 
124 He was a ryttare, and rusthållare (that is, a farmer who was responsible for equipping a cavalry solider). Hansson, Nils (I659)
 
125 He was a ryttmästareReutervall, Bengt (I20275)
 
126 He was a SnickareJohnson, Carl Gustaf (I2982)
 
127 He was a StatareKäll, Otto Sigfrid (I20068)
 
128 He was a svarvaren, bläckmakaren, carpenter (snickarmästaren), and innkeeper (gästgivaren).

In the household of his daughter Stina Lotta were two other family members, relationship uncertain but perhaps grandchildren of Petter through an undiscovered son Eric (Tj 1323 Odensvi, 147):

Farmhand Pet. Gabriel Hultsberg fr Hallingeberg f 1809.12.19
Maid (syster till Gabriel) Carolina Eriksdotter f Odensvi 1815-08-03 
Hultsberg, Peter (I629)
 
129 He was a SvetsareAndersson, Erik Ingmar (I20086)
 
130 He was a TorpareAndersson, Karl Johan (I20069)
 
131 He was a torpare. His death is variously given as 7 April 1873 and 4 July 1873. His estate was probated 15 April 1873 at Kinda HR. Wåhlstrand, Jonas Fredrik (I3589)
 
132 He was a trädgårdsmästare (gardener) and rusthållare (that is, a farmer who was responsible for equipping a cavalry soldier). Ödman, Jonas (I4283)
 
133 He was a VägverksförmanAndersson, Anders Elving (I20070)
 
134 He was a Vaktmästare (Caretaker). Flintberg, Peter (I5158)
 
135 He was a bishop. Rydelius, Andreas (I20379)
 
136 He was a blacksmith. Wåtz, Johan August (I2867)
 
137 He was a builder (byggmästare). Johansson, Carl Gustaf (I1704)
 
138 He was a bus driver, home and abroad. Johansson, Folke Bror (I19864)
 
139 He was a bus driver. He served in the military 8 May 1950 to 26 August 1951, as PFC US AIR FORCE KOREA. Luce, Wilfred Frank (I97)
 
140 He was a cavalry soldier (ryttare) and crofter (torpare) at Alserum. He served in Tjust Company of the Andra Livgrenadjärregementet. His military record says he was born in 1722. The 1793-1800 household rolls show him and his wife living till hus at Alserum. Ahlgren, Fredrik (I643)
 
141 He was a cavalry soldier and grenadier, joining the army in 1787. He served in Tjust Company of the Andra Livgrenadjärregementet. He would have served in Gustav III's Russian War (Gustav III:s ryska krig) 1788-1790, the First War Against Napoléon (Första kriget mot Napoleon) 1805-1810, and the Finnish War (Finska kriget) 1808-1809.

He has been identified with the Jonas who was born 30 July 1754 at Gärdserum to Peter Jönsson Cavat and Ingrid Johansdotter. Centrala Soldatregistret, the Swedish central soldier's registry, says he was born 30 July 1754, but the 1805-13 household survey says he was born 10 July 1754 in Gärdserum. There was no Jonas born 10 July 1754 in Gärdserum. Barbro Behrendtz (2005), who has made an extensive study of the families in Gärdserum parish, says Peter Cavat's son Jonas is otherwise unaccounted for in later records, and so is the only child who could have been Jonas Svanström.

Was he the Jonas in Västervik in 1770 and 1773?

Jonas gave various ages for himself. The 1780 household survey says he was 26 (born in 1754). However, on the 1783 household survey he said he was 31, which would mean he was born in 1752. On the 1785-86 household survey he stated he was born in 1752. When he joined the army in 1787 he stated he was born about 1760, making himself out to be several years younger than he had previously reported.

Swedes did not necessarily use hereditary surnames at this time, and christening records rarely show the child's surname. Also, children rarely adopted their fathers' military surnames. So, there is no inconsistency with Jonas Svanström being the son of Peter Cavat.

The source of Jonas' surname, Svanström, is not clear. He had the name before he joined the army, so it is not a military surname. Once adopted, surnames often became hereditary. Jonas might have been a great nephew of Ingeborg Persdotter Svanström. If so, Jonas used the surname his father Peter would have had before adopting the military surname Cavat. However, unrelated families often adopted the same surname, and it is possible Jonas was the first to adopt the surname Svanström. In that event, he might have created it from Svenserum, where he was born. It was a common practice to create surnames out of a part of a place name, and Sven- often became Svan-. For example, four of the soldiers who served from Tingetorp in Gärdserum adopted the military surname Tingström, one soldier from Svenserum in Gärdserum adopted the military surname Gerdström, and a soldier from Gullebo adopted the surname Gullqvist.

His father Peter Cavat died when Jonas was five. Barbro Behnrenz says his mother appears on parish rolls, still a widow in old age. Jonas probably went to Västervik as a child.

The 1770-76 Household Survey of Västervik shows a (Jonas Svaström?), age 17 in 1770, as the eldest child in the household of (Måns Larsson?), age 51, at No. 79 in the Western Quarter (AI:2, about p. 31). This family has entries for 1771 and 1773, but the 1776 entry is blank. They were two families living in one house.

The 1771-74 survey of the Eastern Quarter shows what appears to be a Jonas Sjöstrom, age not given, in the household of Olof Larsson (age 76), at No. 105, and another Jonas Svaström, age 52, with a son Jan, age 16, at No. 104 (AI:2, about p. 54).

The 1780-84 household survey of Västervik shows him at No. 49 Western Quarter with his wife and mother-in-law in the household of Peter Edberg. If I am reading the entry correctly, Cajsa Skog was father's mother of Peter Edberg, who was therefore an uncle of Jonas' wife. The 1780-82 communion rolls for Västervik show Jonas and his wife under Timmerman (Carpenters) (p. 156). His mother-in-law was living with them - Cajsa Skoug. He was also described as a carpenter in the 1780 and 1782 christening records of his children. The 1783 communion rolls for Västervik show him and his wife under Repslagare (Ropemakers) (p. 177), and he appears as a ropemaker on the 1785-86 household roll and on the 1785 christening record of his son Johan Peter. The family was also listed on the 1785-86 household roll at No. 28 Western Quarter, in the household of Maria Bengtsdotter, widow of seaman Anders Loftanders. Jonas' mother-in-law died in 1786. He and his wife were listed on the 1785 communion roll (p. 113), with a note that they moved to Gärdserum on 29 March 1787 with another person.

At Gärdserum, Jonas and his wife lived at Brunsvik, as evidenced by the christening record of their son. Two years later, on 2 May 1789, Jonas enlisted in the army, in Tjust Company of the Old Life Grenadier Regiment. At that time the Swedish government funded the army by requiring soldiers to support themselves on government-owned crofts. Jonas was assigned to live at Åkerhagen (Rytt Torp (that is, cavalry croft) No. 48 Svenserum), a soldier's croft in Gärdserum. According to his enlistment papers Jonas was born about 1760 (recte 1754) and was 5'8" tall. He appears on the 1805-1813 household rolls, the earliest for this parish, as "Lif Gr. Jonas Svanström."

The rusthållare, or man responsible for equipping Jonas as a soldier, was farmer Erik Gerdeman (1710-1779), the same man who had equipped Jonas' father, who had also served at Svenserum.

In his children's christening records, Jonas was called Ryttaren (cavalry soldier) in 1787 and 1791, Lif Grenadieren (Life Grenadier) in 1794, and Grenadieren in 1798. An 1803 military roll shows that he was sick at the hospital. He was listed on an 1805 roll. From 1805 to 1813 he is shown on the household survey at Åkerhagen. He seems to have retired in 1809 during the war with Finland, as the 1811 roll shows that his successor at Åkerhagen had served for 2 years.

In 1811 the only child remaining at home was the youngest, Jonas. The elder Jonas and his wife Maja died sometime in or after 1811, probably at Åkerhagen. The 1814-1823 clerical survey does not list either of them at Åkerhagen.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

He was a cavalry soldier and grenadier, joining the army in 1787. He served in Tjust Company of the Andra Livgrenadjärregementet. He would have served in Gustav III's Russian War (Gustav III:s ryska krig) 1788-1790, the First War Against Napoléon (Första kriget mot Napoleon) 1805-1810, and the Finnish War (Finska kriget) 1808-1809.

He has been identified with the Jonas who was born 30 July 1754 at Gärdserum to Peter Jönsson Cavat and Ingrid Johansdotter. Centrala Soldatregistret, the Swedish central soldier's registry, says he was born 30 July 1754, but the 1805-13 household survey says he was born 10 July 1754 in Gärdserum. There was no Jonas born 10 July 1754 in Gärdserum. Barbro Behrendtz (2005), who has made an extensive study of the families in Gärdserum parish, says Peter Cavat's son Jonas is otherwise unaccounted for in later records, and so is the only child who could have been Jonas Svanström.

Jonas gave various ages for himself. The 1780 household survey says he was 26 (born in 1754). However, on the 1783 household survey he said he was 31, which would mean he was born in 1752. On the 1785-86 household survey he stated he was born in 1752. When he joined the army in 1787 he stated he was born about 1760, making himself out to be several years younger than he had previously reported.

Swedes did not necessarily use hereditary surnames at this time, and christening records rarely show the child's surname. Also, children rarely adopted their fathers' military surnames. So, there is no inconsistency with Jonas Svanström being the son of Peter Cavat.

The source of Jonas' surname, Svanström, is not clear. He had the name before he joined the army, so it is not a military surname. Once adopted, surnames often became hereditary. Jonas might have been a great nephew of Ingeborg Persdotter Svanström. If so, Jonas used the surname his father Peter would have had before adopting the military surname Cavat. However, unrelated families often adopted the same surname, and it is possible Jonas was the first to adopt the surname Svanström. In that event, he might have created it from Svenserum, where he was born. It was a common practice to create surnames out of a part of a place name, and Sven- often became Svan-. For example, four of the soldiers who served from Tingetorp in Gärdserum adopted the military surname Tingström, one soldier from Svenserum in Gärdserum adopted the military surname Gerdström, and a soldier from Gullebo adopted the surname Gullqvist.

His father Peter Cavat died when Jonas was five. Jonas' mother Ingrid probably remarried. Jonas probably went to Västervik as a child.

The 1770-76 Household Survey of Västervik shows a (Jonas Svaström?), age 17 in 1770, as the eldest child in the household of (Måns Larsson?), age 51, at No. 79 in the Western Quarter (AI:2, about p. 31). This family has entries for 1771 and 1773, but the 1776 entry is blank. Måns Larsson might have been Jonas' step-father.

The 1771-74 survey of the Eastern Quarter shows what appears to be a Jonas Sjöstrom, age not given, in the household of Olof Larsson (age 76), at No. 105, and another Jonas Svaström, age 52, with a son Jan, age 16, at No. 104 (AI:2, about p. 54).

The 1780-84 household survey of Västervik shows him at No. 49 Western Quarter with his wife and mother-in-law in the household of Peter Edberg. If I am reading the entry correctly, Cajsa Skog was father's mother of Peter Edberg, who was therefore an uncle of Jonas' wife. The 1780-82 communion rolls for Västervik show Jonas and his wife under Timmerman (Carpenters) (p. 156). His mother-in-law was living with them - Cajsa Skoug. He was also described as a carpenter in the 1780 and 1782 christening records of his children. The 1783 communion rolls for Västervik show him and his wife under Repslagare (Ropemakers) (p. 177), and he appears as a ropemaker on the 1785-86 household roll and on the 1785 christening record of his son Johan Peter. The family was also listed on the 1785-86 household roll at No. 28 Western Quarter, in the household of Maria Bengtsdotter, widow of seaman Anders Loftanders. Jonas' mother-in-law died in 1786. He and his wife were listed on the 1785 communion roll (p. 113), with a note that they moved to Gärdserum on 29 March 1787 with another person.

At Gärdserum, Jonas and his wife lived at Brunsvik, as evidenced by the christening record of their son. Two years later, on 2 May 1789, Jonas enlisted in the army, in Tjust Company of the Old Life Grenadier Regiment. At that time the Swedish government funded the army by requiring soldiers to support themselves on government-owned crofts. Jonas was assigned to live at Åkerhagen (Rytt Torp (that is, cavalry croft) No. 48 Svenserum), a soldier's croft in Gärdserum. According to his enlistment papers Jonas was born about 1760 (recte 1754) and was 5'8" tall. He appears on the 1805-1813 household rolls, the earliest for this parish, as "Lif Gr. Jonas Svanström."

The rusthållare, or man responsible for equipping Jonas as a soldier, was farmer Erik Gerdeman (1710-1779), the same man who had equipped Jonas' father, who had also served at Svenserum.

In his children's christening records, Jonas was called Ryttaren (cavalry soldier) in 1787 and 1791, Lif Grenadieren (Life Grenadier) in 1794, and Grenadieren in 1798. An 1803 military roll shows that he was sick at the hospital. He was listed on an 1805 roll. From 1805 to 1813 he is shown on the household survey at Åkerhagen. He seems to have retired in 1809 during the war with Finland, as the 1811 roll shows that his successor at Åkerhagen had served for 2 years.

In 1811 the only child remaining at home was the youngest, Jonas. The elder Jonas and his wife Maja died sometime in or after 1811, probably at Åkerhagen. The 1814-1823 clerical survey does not list either of them at Åkerhagen. 
Svanström, Jonas (I121)
 
142 He was a crofter (torpare). His marriage date is also given as 5 October 1788 at Åtvid. Fredriksson, Elias (I641)
 
143 He was a crofter (torparen). In 1845 he was living at Ramundsnås in Ukna Parish. Between 1872 and 1876 he was living at Överström in Ukna Parish. His household was composed of a woman Maria, Claes' son Lars, and two infant grandsons. Eriksson, Klas (I1744)
 
144 He was a farmer (bonde) and assessor (nämndeman) at Berg. He might have been the Måns Larsson born 14 March 1712 to Åtvid to Lars Persson and Ingrid Andersdotter. Larsson, Måns (I651)
 
145 He was a farmer (bonde) at Lind. Johansson, Anders (I647)
 
146 He was a farmer (bonde), rusthållare (that is, a farmer who was responsible for equipping a cavalry soldier), and crofter (torpare). He was a wealthy farmer and could read, but his fortunes declined dramatically over the course of his life. During his time as a farmer, he was a wealthy man, who stood high on the ranking scale. When his daughter Brita Catarina was baptized in 1742, many people of standing were present. At the top of the scale was "Högvälborne Baronen på Nääs, David Lejonhielm" (the High Right Honorable Baron of Nääs, David Leijonhielm). The baron's wife was Margareta Rosenstierna from Kvistrum in Gärdserum.

Nils Vedberg lived as a bonde and rusthållare at Torp in Åtvid parish until 1766, when he went as a crofter (torpare) to Sjöbacka in Torp. What caused his social decline is unknown. It might have been his financial burden as a rusthållare. He had to equip a calvary soldier in Tjust company, Östgöta cavalry. During the Pomeranian War (1757-62), Tjust company consisted of 100 men, with horses and baggage. Both riders and horses were infected with disease from lack of maintenance and care. By December 1758 the regiment could field only 257 mounted horsemen of 800. It was costly for the rusthållaren back home to sustain these losses.

(Ansedel Nils Vedbeg, http://web.telia.com/~u96008370/0001/50_230.htm, visited Sept. 17, 2009.) 
Vedberg, Nils (I5054)
 
147 He was a farmer (bonde), and nämndemanAndersson, Olof (I20404)
 
148 He was a farmer (bonde). Andersson, Jacob (I1803)
 
149 He was a farmer (bonde). Bengtsson, Nils (I3794)
 
150 He was a farmer. His name is said to have been Adolf Ferdinand or Adolf Augustus. He was christened Adolf Ferdinand. In America he used the variation Adolph. The middle name Augustus appears on the birth certificate of his daughter Hildur (1899).

Adolf is said by his descendants to have been drafted into the Swedish army about 1878 and to have served for a short time, about three months. I have not been able to find any record of his military service, but after 1812 all Swedish men between the ages of 20 and 25 had to serve in the armed forces 12 days a year, changing in 1858 to four weeks per two years. Adolf had to serve, even though he was a pacifist. His daughter Hildur said that he served as a Palace Guard, but there are no records of such service. Perhaps there is some confusion here: he does not seem to have been a "royal guardsman" but he was a "railway guardsman." Railway guardsmen were a part of the military.

Adolf left Ukna 24 October 1881 and came to Dalhem on 22 November 1881, where he worked as a farmhand at Vallemåla. On 14 November 1884 he moved from Dalhem to Gärdserum, where he worked as a farmhand for his uncle Sven Ögrim at Toletorp under Tingtorp. In 1886 he married Ögrim's foster daughter, Josefina. They moved to Forssaström on 9/11 April 1888 where Adolf worked as a railway porter (stationskarl).

Adolf and his family emigrated to America in 1891, because he was a very devout man, who objected to the draft. He did not want his sons to have to serve in the army. On 26 March 1891 he and his family left Gärdserum for North America. The emigrant register gives his name as "Stationskarl A. F. Svanstrom", his residence as Forstaström, and his destination as North America. The family would have traveled by train from Forstaström to New Carlisle, outside Göteborg. The Svanströms arrived at New Carlisle on 10 April 1891 and on the same day left Göteborg on the S.S. Romeo bound for England. The Romeo operated by the Wilson Line as a shuttle between Göteborg and Hull. The ship traveled across the Skagerrak strait, south through the North Sea and up the Humber River to the English port of Kingston-upon-Hull. There, the North Eastern Railway Company had a large waiting room near the Paragon Railway Station where travelers could "see the ticket agents, get washed, use the toilet and keep sheltered from the weather." Most travelers stayed only a short time before leaving on one of the long "emigrant trains" for a three or four hour ride to Liverpool where they could board a transatlantic steamer for North America.

In Liverpool the Svanströms took passage on the S.S. City of Chester, traveling steerage class to New York City. There were 1,120 immigrants on board (1,049 of them travelling in steerage), mostly Swedes and Norwegians, but also many English, Scottish and Irish, a sprinkling of Dutch, Germans, Welsh, and a few Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders. The ship's passenger list shows Adolf F. Svanström, laborer, age 29; Carolina J. Classon, age 25; Hugo Ferdinand, age 4; and Johan Martin, age 2; and three pieces of baggage. Their destination is given simply as "U.S." They arrived in New York on April 27, after a journey of 17 days. They are said to have traveled with Adolf's cousin, but I have not been able to identify him or her, unless it was Anna Marie Wåtz, a cousin who came to America the same year.

In America, the family settled in Indiana, at La Porte, where Josephine's grandfather lived. A year later they moved to Rockford, Illinois, where Adolph worked at a factory and the family attended the Mission Church. Adolph became a American citizen on 13 October 1896 in the county court at Rockford. There is no record that Josephine, Hugo or Martin were ever naturalized.

Like many Swedish men of his time, Adolph worked in order to be able to buy a farm some day. The family acquired their farm and moved to Chetek, Wisconsin between June 1899 and June 1900. His obituary says that his health was already failing when the family moved to Chetek, and that he believed the northern climate would be more agreeable. Adolph supplemented his income by working as a lumberjack. He was also organist at the local church in Chetek.

He and his family were enumerated on 1900 census at Chetek: Adolph F. Swanstrom (37), Caroline J. (32), Hugo F. (14), John M. (11), Esther E. (7), Ellen S. (4) and Hilder M. (1). The census says that he was a farmer and owned his farm. He was listed as a naturalized citizen, who came to America in 1891.

In May 1903 Adolph's nephews John and Fred Anderson came from Sweden to America, and settled first in Chetek, near Adolf and his family. They lived with Adolph's family after they arrived. According to Sue Helgeland, Harlan and Lorene Anderson remember hearing that Adolph was very well liked in the family, which is why John and Fred chose to stay with him.

Adolf died of pneumonia in 1904. His daughter Hildur later wrote, "In Chetek, Wisconsin just before my father died, he opened his blue eyes wide and said in Swedish, "Vems portar står öpna fur mig" which translates as "Whose portals stand open for me." Funeral services were held at the Lutheran church. His son Hugo, then 17, took over support of the family.

Adolf's grave is hard to find. Cousin Sue Helgeland describes its location in the cemetery as follows. Enter from the south and take the path on the right. Go in about 100 yards, more or less, and it will be on your right, next to a tree and directly behind a large stone with LANGDON that's right next to the path. Sue cleaned the grave in 2012. She says, "It's a lovely resting place, surrounded by trees and the lake just across the street."

Other Relatives

At least one of Adolf's cousins also immigrated to America. About 1906-1908, Adolf's widow moved to Burlingame, Kansas, where Adolf's cousin lived. I have not been able to identify this cousin, but there are several possibilities.

Adolf's uncle Petter Magnus Svanström came to America in 1880, and settled at Leonardsville, Kansas.

Adolf's cousin Anna Maria Wåtz / Wootz immigrated also in 1891, at the invitation of their uncle Petter. She married Eric Edward Olson before 1903 and moved from Topeka to Burlingame. Eric Olson and his brother Gust Olson were godparents to Adolf's son Harry. Their step-brother Peter Persson was the lay minister who baptized Harry.

Anders Erik August Lannerdal, born 10 October 1860 in Ukna, emigrated to Rio de Janeiro on 22 September 1890.

A Frans Svanstrom traveled to America a few days before Adolf and his family. He is listed on the passenger list of the S.S. Aurania, a laborer, age 19, travelling with one piece of baggage, intended destination Illinois. The Aurania embarked from Liverpool, stopped in Queenstown, and arrived in New York City on 20 April 1891. This Frans is too young to have been Adolf's brother of that name. He might have been a cousin, but he was not the Frans Edvard who came in 1880.

Swan O[skar?] Swanstrom, of Osage City might also have been a relative of this family. The county records show no births, marriages, or deaths for a Swanstrom between 1885 and 1909, no land sales to a Swanstrom between 1888 and 1909, and no directory listing in Osage City for a Swanstrom in 1913. However, Swan Swanstrom probably lived in one of the smaller towns in Osage County and was overlooked when I searched the directory. He owned a farm in Grant Township, two or three miles west of Osage City. He died 4 May 1918 at Osage City, leaving a widow Christina (born about 1841 and died 1 October 1922); daughters Ida Anderson (born about 1866), of Portland, Oregon, and Blanda Ashbaugh (born about 1874), of Osage City, Kansas; and a step-son Louis Centra (born about 1886), of Portland, Oregon. If Swan was a relative of Adolf he was probably a first cousin of Adolf's father.

Arms of Swanström: Azure two bars wavy Argent between three swans Argent. Crest: out of a crest coronet or, a demi-swan Argent. Motto: Caveat Raptor. Notes: These arms are quite different from the spurious coat of arms distributed by an American company called Halbert's for the Swanstrom family: Gules a fess wavy Azure between a swan proper in chief and two twinflowers proper in base. 
Swanstrom, Adolph Ferdinand (I451)
 

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