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201 He was an armorer (rustmästare) in the Kalmar Regiment (1709), and sergeant (15 October 1718). (Kalmar regementes personhistoria). Rising, Henrik (I4144)
 
202 He was an attorney. Wallerius, Isak (I3118)
 
203 He was an officer of the Salvation Army. He went to Norway for the first time in 1895, when his father was an officer of the Salvation Army there. In 1905 he went to the Salvation Army's International War School in London. He subsequently served as an officer in England, Japan and several European countries. His father was Head of the Salvation Army in Norway (1906-1912), and Tobias became a Norwegian citizen in 1908. He was Head of the Salvation Army in Norway (1945-1948), where he made significant relief efforts in war-torn northern Norway. He was International Secretary for Europe at the Salvation Army's London office (1948-1951), and Head in Sweden (1951-1956).

He had five children. His descendants affectionately call him "the Old Prophet".

Kommandør TI Øgrim plass outside the Salvation Army headquarters at Berhard Getz gate in Oslo is named after him. 
Øgrim, Tobias Immanuel (I1683)
 
204 He was Commander of the Salvation Army, and a hymn-writer. He trained at a folkskoleseminariet in Linköping, then worked as an elementary school teacher in Järla, Nacka. He joined the Salvation Army in 1883, and served as a soldier in Stockholm's Third Corps. He was Head of the Officer School (1888-1889), Field Secretary (1892), Chief Secretary in Norway (1895-1896), Head of the Salvation Army in Denmark (1896-1898), Head in Northern England (1898-1903), Commander in Finland (1903-1906), Commander in Norway (1906-1912), Head in Sweden (1912-1919), and Head in Germany (1919-1925). He wrote nine hymns, four of which are still included in the Salvation Army Songbook.

He was awarded the Red Cross Medal and received the personal thanks of German president Hindenburg for his relief work in Germany following World War I. He was also a Commander of the Vasa Order, Second Class (Swedish).

He and his wife Kristine toured the western United States from December 1926 through February 1927. He and his wife Maren, of Stockholm, appear on the passenger list of the S.S. Stockholm, which left Göteborg on 17 September 1926. Ship's passenger lists show he and his wife arrived in New York from Göteborg on 28 September 1926. He spoke in Spokane (31 December 1926), Tacoma (4 January 1927), Everett (5 January), Bellingham (6 January), and Seattle, Washington (7 January); Portland, Oregon (11 January); San Francisco (15 January), Oakland (16 January), San Francisco (18 January), Lytton (20 January), San Franscisco (21 January), Turlock (22 January), Kingsburg (23 January), Los Angeles (25 January), San Diego (26 January), and Los Angeles (27 January), California; Salt Lake City, Utah (30 January); and Denver, Colorado (1 February). During this brief visit, he was expected to visit his foster sister, Mrs. Josephine Swanstrom, of Rock Springs, Wyoming. Presumably he did so, as her children were impressed with him, and one of them, Ellen, joined the Salvation Army in Denver.

A play about his life, Kommendör Øgrim, by Per-Olof Ilhammar, was performed in Överum in the summer of 2009.

In addition to the children listed here, Wikipedia says, "A daughter, Major Mrs. Lydia Sundström, also served mostly in Sweden, but also had assignments in Norway." (http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johan_%C3%96grim) 
Ögrim, Sven Johan (I1677)
 
205 He was Coroner, City and County of Denver.

Obituary

The Denver Post, Sunday, May 27, 2001 (Denver & The West)

A Colorado Life Death was familiar companion Pearl Harbor survivor, cop had tender side

Jim Sheeler Special to The Denver Post

"When she first hung the bullet around her neck, she didn't know its story. "'He sent it to me before he really knew me that well, ' says Iris Legg, as she looks down at the disarmed piece of brass. 'He just wrote in the letter, 'This is in memory of Pearl Harbor.' He said, 'I want you to remember that was the worst day of my life, but I lived through it."

"The young man who sent her the bullet on a necklace looked up in the sky on Dec. 7, 1941, and watched the bombs fall. A few minutes later, he felt hot shrapnel in his arm and stood in the blood of his friends. Years later, he would see thousands more bodies over a span of 30 years, making a career of finding out how people died. With everything he had seen during his life, Bill Legg could easily have become a man hardened to death, someone who kept his distance. Instead, family and friends say, he softened.

"'He had to tell so many people that their loved ones had died, ' his wife says. 'He had such a tender heart that he cried with them.' William Ghormley Legg died April 20. He was 81.

"Close family

"Long before people knew him as a Pearl Harbor survivor and veteran coroner's investigator, little Billy Legg was known throughout the neighborhoods of Englewood, where the red-headed, freckle-faced boy, along with his dog Ted, would throw The Denver Post every morning.

"The paper route helped support the family, as his father had died when Bill was an infant. The family also sold vegetables and cleaned the church to help make ends meet. The family members remained close- knit, helping each other out all their lives - Bill is survived by his 107-year-old mother, who still lives in Denver.

"When he was 12, Bill had made enough money to buy an old Dodge flatbed truck, so one day he traded in his bicycle and bought the contraption, which he promptly fixed up, beginning a lifelong addiction to restoring old cars.

"He attended Englewood High School, then decided to join the Navy. He enlisted Dec. 7, 1940.

"'Every Dec. 7, he would toss and turn all night. Sometimes he would get up, and I would hear him sobbing. I'd ask if he wanted to talk about it and he said, no, he couldn't, ' says his wife. 'Eventually, I finally got him to tell me what happened, ' she says. That night, she got out a pen, and took notes as he told her the story.

"'On the day of Dec. 7, 1941, he was stationed at Kaneohe Naval Air Station, ' she says. 'He had his swimming trunks on.'

"Deadly surprise

"'At 7:30 a.m. I jump into my swim trunks, grab my laundry and head down the block-long pier with full intention of doing my laundry before my comrades awakened after their night on the town, ' reads the beginning of William Legg's account of the attack. 'I was scrubbing away when I heard and saw water splashing around the PBY seaplanes anchored to my left in the water. Almost instantaneously I heard the thunderous bombs dropping on the PBYs. One of the bombs landed close enough to me to pick me up, throw me 7 feet in the air. I landed on my back. When I regained consciousness, the Japanese planes had circled around, and I saw clearly the symbol of the rising sun on the underwing. I knew we had been sneaked up on. We were at war with Japan.'

"With shrapnel from the bomb embedded in his arm, which was gushing blood, Legg ran to the infirmary, where a medic stopped the bleeding and quickly stitched him up. Barefoot and shirtless, he ran to the hangar to help, and his commanding officer told him to man the machine gun, where a man had just been killed.

"'As I stood in the warm blood of my fallen comrade, I became furious enough to point the machine gun dead center on the pilot' of an incoming Japanese plane, he said.

"'I saw his head hit the instrument panel of his plane, and I stood and watched as he crashed into Kansas Hill.'

"Later, Legg made a trek to the downed Japanese plane and pulled a bullet from one of its guns. In her living room, Iris Legg touches the bullet around her neck.

"'When I received it, I burst into tears. I wore it all the time. It represents to me bravery. It represents to me heroism.'

"To Bill Legg, it represented this: 'My prayer is that December 7th and the four years that followed would make a better place and a safer country for my children, grandchildren and future generations to live without any fear of a sneak attack or any act of war on our soil, ' he said. 'God bless us all and God help us all.'

"Just one glance

"During the entire war, Iris received letters from Bill Legg, though she had never met him in person. Before his train had pulled away back in 1940, he saw the pretty girl and asked a friend to get her address. His introduction arrived with his first letter. The real introduction happened four years later.

"The day he returned from the war, Legg jumped out from behind a building in Denver, surprising Iris.

"'He grabbed me and said, 'Hi, I'm Bill.' Then he kissed me, ' she says. 'Two months later, we were married. Nobody thought it would last. Even the minister didn't think it would last.'

"Fifty-six years later, Iris Legg holds up a photo of her husband in his first job, as a Colorado State Patrol motorcycle officer. He worked with the patrol for several years, mostly around the Floyd Hill area, until a woman ran him down after he gave her a speeding ticket. When he recovered, he found a job with the Denver coroner's office.

"'They hired him because they wanted someone with a stomach for horrible things that happened, ' his wife says.

"Over the next 33 years, he saw plenty more.

"'He talked to me a lot about what he saw, ' Iris Legg says. 'When a child was killed, that was the most upsetting to him.'

"One day he came home and went straight to Margie, one of his four daughters, hugged her tightly and didn't let go.

"'A little girl had run into the street and was hit by a car. He said, 'I couldn't wait to get home and hug her.' He said the little girl looked just like Margie.'

"Sharing 'Bill-isms'

"Just as he was known for his professionalism at work, he was known for his laugh at home. The family still reels off his silly jokes they called 'Bill-isms.'

"He would ask what material his daughter's dress was. 'Oh, it's cotton, ' she would reply. Then he would touch her shoulder and say, 'Well, now it's felt.' He'd look at his daughter's friends when they came by and said, 'My, you've grown a foot since I last saw you.' Then he'd point to their foot. 'And there it is, ' he would say.

"In his spare time, he continued his teenage hobby of restoring cars, and over the years he brought back to life a 1909 Maxwell, a 1915 Model T and a 1925 Model T.

"Around the neighborhood, every kid knew that if his garage door was open, he could take his bike to Mr. Legg and have him fix it. 'One little boy next door tried to call somewhere once and the telephone line was busy, ' Iris Legg says. 'He asked his parents to call Mr. Legg to have him fix it so the line wasn't busy.'

"Inside the house, his wife and daughters knew that when he got in one of his moods they'd have to watch out.

"'He could tickle, ' says his daughter, Margie. 'Man, he could tickle.'

"'When he got into one of his teasing moods, he'd follow us all through the house just so he could tickle us, ' his wife says. 'He thought that was the greatest sport.'

"Occasionally, his wife would wake up to find the table empty, and no sign of her husband. Then she would walk out to the porch, where he would have breakfast and roses waiting for her.

"As she looks over the story of Pearl Harbor, the shining brass bullet and the photos of him from the coroner's office, her voice cracks.

'"A lot of men get hardened to it, ' she says again.

"'He was tender.'

Photo Caption: Special to The Denver Post Bill Legg was a member of the Colorado State Patrol during the early '50s until a woman ran him down after he gave her a speeding ticket. When he recovered he became a coroner's investigator. This photo of Legg was taken after he enlisted in the Navy on Dec. 7, 1940. Legg was wounded by shrapnel during the attack on Pearl Harbor, but after being stitched up, he manned a machine gun and shot down a Japanese plane. Despite a life of dealing with death, Bill Legg, shown in 1989, could still crack a joke and enjoy a good laugh. 
Legg, William Ghormley (I24)
 
206 He was living at Överström in Ukna Parish and working as a farmhand (dräng) in 1873 when he married Johanna Fyrstén. On 20 October 1881 they moved from Ukna Parish to Lofta Parish, where he worked at Överström No. 182 (p. 414). Lars was a farm laborer, so he moved and changed jobs about the same time each year. In 1887 they moved to Västra Ed Parish, and in 1890 they moved to Loftahammar, where they settled down. The following year, Lars' step-daughter Josefina and her husband Adolf emigrated to America. Lars and Johanna moved to Humlebo, where they were still living in 1900. Klasson, Lars Erik (I1731)
 
207 He was Operations Manager, Continental Oil Company. Porter, John Russell (I113167)
 
208 He was Program Director of the Norsk Riskskringkasting AS (NRK), the government-owned Norwegian television company. Øgrim, Kristian Becker (I1691)
 
209 He was the homestead owner at Räfshult. Andersson, Viktor (I2962)
 
210 He was vicar (kyrkoherde) of Kvillinge. Matthiae, Laurentius (I4855)
 
211 Head of personnel department at Erikssons. Ögrim, Sven Fritjof (I19899)
 
212 Headmaster of primary school. Ögrim, Siv Ester Lenny (I19869)
 
213 Hemmansägare Andersson, Karl Gillis (I2964)
 
214 Hemmansägare Andersson, Nils Olof (I146617)
 
215 Hemmansägare Andersson, Sven Gustaf (I146620)
 
216 Her ancestry is unknown. She probably took the surname Svanström from the farm Svenserum, which belonged to the manor of Kvistrum.

Her marriage record calls her Jungfru Ingeborg Svanström. Later records call her Ingeborg Persdotter. The title jungfru, at this time, suggests she was a maid to a wealthy family or the daughter of a man of standing. She might have been a maid to Margareta Rosenstierna of Qvistrum (now Kvistrum) in Gärdserum, whose husband David Henrik Leijonhielm was godfather to Ingeborg's first child.

She was perhaps a daughter of Petter Gellman Frost (c1671-1751); and perhaps a sister of Annika Persdotter (1698-1782), who married Fredric Hansson Trybom. She might have been a relative of Petter Jonsson Cavat (1732-1754) whose descendants also took the surname Svanström;

She died of a fever (magfeber). 
Svanström, Ingeborg (I3581)
 
217 Her birth certificate lists her name as Ester Adolffina Svanstrom, and gives her parents' names as Adolf Svanstrom and Karolina Josephfina Carlson. A later birth certificate gives her name as Esther Frances Adolp[hina] Swanstrom, and lists her parents as Adolph Ferdinand Swanstrom and Josephine Carolina Klason.

She was a school teacher. She was born in America to Swedish immigrant parents.

Her early years were spent in the city of Rockford, but the family moved to a farm in Chetek, Wisconsin when she was about 8. When Esther was 11 her father died. She had been his pride and joy and was heartbroken by his death. Because her mother could not make ends meet with six children, Esther and her brother Martin went to live with a cousin of their father's in Burlingame, Kansas. I have not been able to discover the name of this cousin. Esther called them "Uncle" and "Aunt." The cousin was very kindly and owned a sugar plantation in South America. The cousin's wife was neither kind nor abusive. While Esther lived with them, the cousin's wife had a baby. Esther worked for the cousin's wife as housekeeper and babytender. She had been very close to her younger sister Ellen, and missed her very much.

When Esther was 13 her mother moved the rest of the family to Burlingame, but soon moved on to homestead in Wyoming. Esther stayed behind to finish high school, as did her brother Martin. Esther went to live with the Terry family as a boarder, at the corner of Fremont and Dacotah Streets, kitty corner from the Burlingame School. This school was built in 1902 and would have been fairly new when the Swanstroms lived there. The house where Esther lived is now owned by Jay Denny (1993). In the summers, Esther lived in Kansas City, where she worked in a department store to earn money to buy clothes and books for the next school year.

Esther graduated from high school in Osage City. She might have been the Esther Swanson who was listed in the 1912 graduating class of Osage City High School as one of eight students.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Her birth certificate lists her name as Ester Adolffina Svanstrom, and gives her parents' names as Adolf Svanstrom and Karolina Josephfina Carlson. A later birth certificate gives her name as Esther Frances Adolp[hina] Swanstrom, and lists her parents as Adolph Ferdinand Swanstrom and Josephine Carolina Klason.

She was a school teacher. She was born in America to Swedish immigrant parents.

Her early years were spent in the city of Rockford, but the family moved to a farm in Chetek, Wisconsin when she was about 8. When Esther was 11 her father died. She had been his pride and joy and was heartbroken by his death. Because her mother could not make ends meet with six children, Esther and her brother Martin went to live with a cousin of their father's in Burlingame, Kansas. Esther called them "Uncle" and "Aunt." The cousin was very kindly and owned a sugar plantation in South America. The cousin's wife was neither kind nor abusive. While Esther lived with them, the cousin's wife had a baby. Esther worked for the cousin's wife as housekeeper and babytender. She had been very close to her younger sister Ellen, and missed her very much.

I have not been able to discover the name of this cousin but I think it might have Eric Edward Olson and his wife Anna Wootz. Anna was Adolf's cousin. If so, the baby would have been Clarence Olson, born about 1904. His younger sister Marie was born in 1906.

When Esther was 13 her mother moved the rest of the family to Burlingame, but soon moved on to homestead in Wyoming. Esther stayed behind to finish high school, as did her brother Martin. Esther went to live with the Terry family as a boarder, at the corner of Fremont and Dacotah Streets, kitty corner from the Burlingame School. This school was built in 1902 and would have been fairly new when the Swanstroms lived there. The house where Esther lived is now owned by Jay Denny (1993). In the summers, Esther lived in Kansas City, where she worked in a department store to earn money to buy clothes and books for the next school year.

Esther graduated from high school in Osage City. She might have been the Esther Swanson who was listed in the 1912 graduating class of Osage City High School as one of eight students. 
Swanström, Esther Frances (I54427)
 
218 Her birth name was Elin Sofia Svanström. She was a school teacher. She was born while her immigrant parents were living in Rockford, Illinois. She was about 5 when her family moved to Chetek, Wisconsin and about 8 when her father died. A few years after her father's death, her mother moved the family to Burlingame, Kansas, where they had relatives. Still later, Ellen moved with her mother to Marbleton, Wyoming, where the family had a truck farm and owned the local hotel (in which Ellen helped her mother). It was in Marbleton that Ellen graduated from high school. She was in the first graduating class from Block School in 1915. She enrolled at the University of Wyoming in Laramie and upon graduation became a school teacher. The 1930 census shows her as a teacher in Laramie, lodging in the household of Will Ellenberger (next door to Ralph Murdock, who was also from Big Piney).

After college she moved to Denver, Colorado to be near her married sister Esther Swanstrom Porter. During this portion of her life Ellen carried on an extensive correspondence with her relatives in Sweden and more especially with her father's cousin, Johan Ögrim, who at that time (1919) was Head of the Salvation Army in Germany. Betty Jane Porter Borst has his 1919 address in Berlin. He intended to visited the family during his 1927 tour of the U.S., and probably did. Motivated by Cousin Johan, Ellen did volunteer work for the Salvation Army in the Denver area. She later became disillusioned with ringing bells on street corners in the middle of winter and quit the organization, but always maintained an active interest in their work.

About 1920 Ellen moved to Hillsdale, Wyoming, where she taught Home Economics at the local high school. Here she met and married Wilbur Hinkle, a salesman and post office employee. Ellen was very close to her older sister Esther and she often drove from Wyoming down to Denver for weekend visits. The Porters remember driving up to Wyoming for a visit with Aunt Ellen.

Ellen and Wilbur later moved to Fresno, California (before 1937) to be near her mother and her sister Hildur Swanstrom Luce. They bought a home at 4753 Grant Street and for the next several years Ellen engaged herself with the contracting and building of a house on the lot adjacent to their home and with the developing of their "ranch", which consisted on some acreage northeast of their home. On this land Ellen planted a circle of all varieties of nut and fruit trees and berry bushes. The plan was to sell the produce to the Sno-Crop Company, but this dream was never realized.

During the Great Depression of the 1930s Ellen took a job as a Social Worker in Fresno. She was a kind woman and it was hard for her to see so many needy people. She gave them food from her own home and otherwise helped them from her own resources. For her own good, Ellen finally had to quit this job. Ellen could not have children of her own. About 1938 Ellen and Wilbur took in a foster boy, Dean, whom they wanted very much to adopt. After they had the child for a while the state social services agency took him back and they were both heartbroken.

Ellen was interested in photography. A picture she took of her niece, Doris Luce, aged 9, was displayed in a local camera shop. Ellen was also interested in Spiritualism and tried many times to contact her parents at séances. After Ellen died, Wilbur often mentioned that he had "talked to Ellen the other night" in letters to her brother Harry.

After retirement Ellen and Wilbur lived in Florida and Phoenix. Ellen never lived to see her ranch fully developed. A picture of their Fresno home now in the possession of Justin Swanstrom has written on the back in Wilbur's handwriting "Ellen and I loved our little house." Ellen is remembered as being stylish, exhuberant, a take-over type, happy, and as someone always searching for new experiences. Her photo album in now in the possession of her niece June Porter Clement. Her upright piano now belongs to her grand niece Evonne Howery Carlson. 
Swanstrom, Ellen Sophie (I10)
 
219 Her birth name was Hildur Maria Swanstrom. She was a legal secretary. She was born in Rockford and moved with her parents to Chetek, Wisconsin while she was still a baby. Her musical ability became apparent at an early age. Hildur's father was church organist, so musical talent ran in the family. Her sisters Ellen and Esther often recounted how their little sister Hildur would stand at the family organ and play it, almost from the time she learned to walk. Hildur composed her first song at the age of 3, when her sister Ellen came home from school on day to discover that their father had sold Ellen's favorite cow. Hildur's first composition was "The Cow Song, " written for her sister Ellen. Hildur's father died when she was three and the family moved to Burlingame, Kansas, then on to Marbleton, Wyoming, where Hildur helped her mother in the hotel the family owned there.

Hildur enrolled at the University of Wyoming in Laramie, becoming their youngest student ever at the age of 16 years, 3 months. After graduation she became a school teacher like her sisters, working at Big Piney. Among her pupils were the children of her future father-in-law Wilford Luce, the chairman of the local school board. She also gave private lessons in music to his daughter, Vivian. Karen Luce Davis of Farmington, Utah has a "yearbook" with a photo of Hildur pasted to the front and the names of her students inside. These names include Wilford [Frank], Vivian and Edwin Luce. In 1921 Hildur married her former pupil, Frank Luce. Hildur went on to become a legal secretary.

For many years they spent their vacations in Chetek, where Hildur lived as a girl. They bought a house on Bass Lake, and planned to retire there. After Hildur retired at the age of 65 they moved to Chetek, but Frank became ill with cancer. A few months after their new house was completed they sold it and returned to California.

Obituary

Hildur Luce

Hildur Marie Luce, 85, of Lodi died at a local convalescent hospital following a lengthy illness.

She was a native of Illinois and came to this area in 1951. She was formerly employed by the State of California as a secretary in the Farm Labor Office.

She retired in 1965 after 10 years with the State and was a member of the Public Employee Retirement System.

Mrs. Luce is survived by her husband, Frank Luce of Stockton; one daughter, Doris M. Pope of Walnut Creek; one son, Wilfred Luce of Arizona and three grandchildren.

Time and place of service will be announced by Gierhart and Wells Funeral Home at a later date.

Lodi News-Sentinel, July 16, 1984, p. 18.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Her birth name was Hildur Maria Svanström. She was a legal secretary. She was born in Rockford and moved with her parents to Chetek, Wisconsin while she was still a baby. Her musical ability became apparent at an early age. Hildur's father was church organist, so musical talent ran in the family. Her sisters Ellen and Esther often recounted how their little sister Hildur would stand at the family organ and play it, almost from the time she learned to walk. Hildur composed her first song at the age of 3, when her sister Ellen came home from school on day to discover that their father had sold Ellen's favorite cow. Hildur's first composition was "The Cow Song, " written for her sister Ellen. Hildur's father died when she was three and the family moved to Burlingame, Kansas, then on to Marbleton, Wyoming, where Hildur helped her mother in the hotel the family owned there.

Hildur enrolled at the University of Wyoming in Laramie, becoming their youngest student ever at the age of 16 years, 3 months. After graduation she became a school teacher like her sisters, working at Big Piney. Among her pupils were the children of her future father-in-law Wilford Luce, the chairman of the local school board. She also gave private lessons in music to his daughter, Vivian. Karen Luce Davis of Farmington, Utah has a "yearbook" with a photo of Hildur pasted to the front and the names of her students inside. These names include Wilford [Frank], Vivian and Edwin Luce. In 1921 Hildur married her former pupil, Frank Luce. Hildur went on to become a legal secretary.

For many years they spent their vacations in Chetek, where Hildur lived as a girl. They bought a house on Bass Lake, and planned to retire there. After Hildur retired at the age of 65 they moved to Chetek, but Frank became ill with cancer. A few months after their new house was completed they sold it and returned to California.

Obituary

Hildur Luce

Hildur Marie Luce, 85, of Lodi died at a local convalescent hospital following a lengthy illness.

She was a native of Illinois and came to this area in 1951. She was formerly employed by the State of California as a secretary in the Farm Labor Office.

She retired in 1965 after 10 years with the State and was a member of the Public Employee Retirement System.

Mrs. Luce is survived by her husband, Frank Luce of Stockton; one daughter, Doris M. Pope of Walnut Creek; one son, Wilfred Luce of Arizona and three grandchildren.

Time and place of service will be announced by Gierhart and Wells Funeral Home at a later date.

(Lodi News-Sentinel, July 16, 1984, page 18.) 
Swanstrom, Hildur Marie (I11)
 
220 Her birthdate is also given as 26 July 1849. In 1864 she came with her sister Johanna from Gamleby to re-join their parents in Vimmerby. When their father moved 1866 to Sund she remained behind with her sister Johanna, and worked as a maid at Arhult. She moved with her brother Carl from Doderhult 4 October 1868 to Ed.

According to the 1900 and 1910 censuses, she came to America in 1871, and married August Nelson in 1875. In 1900 she had no children, living or dead. 
Fyrstén, Christina Mathilda (I1714)
 
221 Her christening record confirms her birthdate as 19 June 1782 and her name as Ingrid Catharina. Her birthdate is erroneously given as 1 April 1781 on the 1805-13 household roll for Gärdserum, which also gives her name as "Ingrid Cath" (p. 144).

In 1808 she was working as a maid in the household of Salomon Månsson in Gärdserum. In 1809 she moved back to her parents' home. In 1811 she was again working as a maid.

From 1837 to 1841 she worked as a maid in the household of the widower Jonas Svensson at Stora Wed. There are notes during this time that she was penniless, and in 1837 "Bruter mot 6h Bruder." In 1844 she was working as a maid in the household of the farmer Bengt Gustafsson at Lycketorp, and in 1846 in the household of the widow Maja Lena Carlsdotter at Holmbo in Gardserum, Kalmar. 
Svanström, Ingrid Katarina (I3916)
 
222 Her christening record gives her name as Anna. The 1803 christening record for her daughter Inga Lena and 1805 christening record for her son Peter Gustav show her name as Anna Jonsdotter. She was a widow in 1813 when she re-married, but there is no record of the death of her first husband. Wåhlstrand, Anna Ingrid (I620)
 
223 Her estate was probated 4 April 1881 at Kinda HR. Eriksdotter, Stina (I20052)
 
224 Her name was given as Anna Lena, Anna Lena Hultsberg, Lena Hultsberg, Anna Pettersdotter, Anna Hultsberg, and as Anna L. Hultsberg. Hultsberg, Anna Helena (I709)
 
225 Her obituary says her maiden name was Wåhlstrand, but all records call her Gustafsdotter. Gustafsdotter, Anna Charlotta (I20050)
 
226 Her place of death is also given as Högbo in Gävleborg (Behrendtz). Wåhlstrand, Anna (I4465)
 
227 Her step-father's name is Ostler. Fishbeck, Jeanie Elizabeth (I14933)
 
228 His 1811 marriage record says that he was a farmhand and his wife was a maid at Hellerö in Västra Ed. They were living at Hellerö in 1811 when his daughter Ulrica was born. He was described as a crofter (torparen) in the 1826 christening record of his daughter Anna Sofia. Sometime before 1814 they moved to Snörum in Loftahammar. They appear on the 1814-16 household rolls there. In 1815 they moved to Hasselstad in Lofta. In 1818 they moved to Bjorksnås Croft in Dalhem, just outside Ekevik, nine miles south of Gärdserum, and just across Antvarden Lake from Sundet where Carl Svanström lived. They were still living there in 1826, but they do not appear at Bjorksnås on the 1826-27 household roll. Andersson, Johan (I708)
 
229 His aunt Josephine (Fyrsten) Nelson in America left him a small bequest in her 1919 will. She described him as Karl Fyrsten of Fyrstensbruk. Fyrstén, Carl Johan Wilhelm (I1718)
 
230 His birth name was Anders Nilsson. He was a farmer. The 1900 census says he came to America in 1863. Nelson, Andrew (I1720)
 
231 His birth name was Dudley Hamilton Howery, Jr. He was a jeweler, rancher, painter and sculptor. He grew up in Laramie, Wyoming where his family settled when he was about five (1939, but his mother's obituary says 1942). He appears on the 1940 census twice, once in Laramie in his parents' household, and once in Greeley in his grandmother's household.

He completed the 8th grade. In his youth he worked for a ranch in the hills east of Laramie. In 1955 he was a jeweller, working for his father at Howery's in Laramie and living on a ranch on Highway 287 just north of Tie Siding. He bought a ranch near Glendevey, Colorado about 1966 and later took up art professionally. On 31 March 1973 he changed his name to Ridge Earl Durand. Most of his children followed suit. After his father's death in 1983 he changed his name to W. R. Eagle, short for Wind River Eagle, the English form of his Sioux name Tate Wakpa Wanbli. In 1989 he changed his name back to its original form, but continued to use the name Durand professionally.

He was a blood brother of Lakota Medicine Man Pete Catches (Petaga Yuha Mani) and was himself a member of the Eagle Medicine Men's Society.

In 1975 or 1976 he became a mail-order minister in a Baptist denomination.

After his divorce from Charlene Rassmussen in 1984, he lived at 10 Rabbit Run Trail (768 State Hwy 230).

He died in 2002 after a lengthy stay in a nursing home, being treated for cadio-pulmonary disorder. 
Durand, Ridge Earl (I53653)
 
232 His birth name was Hugo Ferdinand Svanström. He was a cabinet maker, farmer and mechanic. He came to America with his parents at the age of 4. He and his 3 year old brother Martin were very excited at first to see the ocean and to be going on a ship, but after a time at sea their interest waned and they became very bored, always wanting to know when they would get to "Amerika."

When the family did get to America, Hugo was very anxious to start school here and learn the English language. The Svanströms, like almost all immigrants, knew and spoke only their native language. When that first day of school arrived Hugo was very excited to finally be going, but he came home that night very disappointed that he had not learned English. It was only a matter of months before he did learn the language, but by then the novelty had worn off.

Hugo's parents were very devout and his father was the church organist in Chetek, Wisconsin. Hugo often recounted his memory of one particular Sunday when he sang a solo while his father played the organ. Throughout the entire performance Hugo was so nervous he was afraid his knees would give way and he would fall down in front of the congregation. That he made it through without this happening, he considered to have been a miracle.

Hugo was nearly 18 when his father died. He became the principle support to his mother after his father's death. Hugo took over the farm work as far as he was able, while continuing to work as an apprentice cabinet maker. Thus he learned his trade and continued to care for his mother throughout the rest of her life.

After Adolf's death, the Swanströms were having trouble making ends meet, so about 1906 they moved to Burlingame, Kansas where they had relatives. Here, as in Chetek, Hugo was both farmer and cabinet maker. The 1910 census shows him as a farmer.

When private developers opened land to homesteading in 1913 to promote a new reclamation project in Wyoming, the Swanströms availed themselves of this opportunity and settled a farm on Muddy Creek near Marbleton, on the Cottonwood Canal (Green River Supply Canal Project). Here Hugo built up a truck farm (potatoes and chickens), while his mother and sister operated the Marbleton Hotel. On 23 March 1914 he recorded the H Lazy S brand, but did not renew in 1925.

"Farmers in this section are now cutting their grain. Those in the field at present are Hugo Swanstrom, C. W. Carlson, A. B. Stout, F. D. Ball, W. E. Spencer and the River Forks folk. But we must take our hats off to Hugo Swanstrom as the real farmer. Mr. Swanstrom has eighty-eight acres of as fine oats as anyone ever saw in this country, and the yield is estimated at thirty bushels per acre and forty-five pounds per bushel. We repeat again, that the right kind of people can farm grain successfully here, and that our land should be valued according to what it is capable of producing. Mr. Swanstrom has raised thoroly matured grain every year since he located under the Cottonwood Canal and his yields have always been satisfactory. (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs., Sep. 20, 1917).

Hugo registered for the World War I draft: Hugo Ferdinand Swanstrom, age 32, naturalized citizen, self-employed rancher at Marbleton, Wyoming.

Unfortunately, the Green River Supply Canal Project never resolved its organizational problems, and the Swanströms never proved their homestead claim.

About 1920 Hugo, his mother, and his brother Harry, moved to Rock Springs. Hugo went in with a friend of his and bought an automobile dealership, which was quite prosperous until the night his friend ran off with the cash and tools. The 1930 census shows him as a laborer, working in a garage. He owned his house at 311 Gail Street, which he reported as valued at $4,500. His mother was living with him.

He moved to California in the 1930s. He was listed on the 1934, 1942 and 1944 voter registration roll of Fresno as a Democrat. In 1934 he was a "garg." at 3632 McKenzie, and his mother was at the same address. In 1942 and 1944 he was a carpenter at 4604 Grant.

Hugo is remembered by his nieces and nephews as being very proper.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

His birth name was Hugo Ferdinand Svanström. He was a cabinet maker, farmer and mechanic. He came to America with his parents at the age of 4. He and his 3 year old brother Martin were very excited at first to see the ocean and to be going on a ship, but after a time at sea their interest waned and they became very bored, always wanting to know when they would get to "Amerika."

When the family did get to America, Hugo was very anxious to start school here and learn the English language. The Svanströms, like almost all immigrants, knew and spoke only their native language. When that first day of school arrived Hugo was very excited to finally be going, but he came home that night very disappointed that he had not learned English. It was only a matter of months before he did learn the language, but by then the novelty had worn off.

Hugo's parents were very devout and his father was the church organist in Chetek, Wisconsin. Hugo often recounted his memory of one particular Sunday when he sang a solo while his father played the organ. Throughout the entire performance Hugo was so nervous he was afraid his knees would give way and he would fall down in front of the congregation. That he made it through without this happening, he considered to have been a miracle.

Hugo was nearly 18 when his father died. He became the principle support to his mother after his father's death. Hugo took over the farm work as far as he was able, while continuing to work as an apprentice cabinet maker. Thus he learned his trade and continued to care for his mother throughout the rest of her life.

After Adolf's death, the Swanströms were having trouble making ends meet, so about 1906 they moved to Burlingame, Kansas where they had relatives. Here, as in Chetek, Hugo was both farmer and cabinet maker. The 1910 census shows him as a farmer.

When the federal government opened land to homesteading to promote a new reclamation project in Wyoming, the Swanströms availed themselves of this opportunity and settled a farm on Muddy Creek near Marbleton. Here Hugo built up a truck farm (potatoes and chickens), while his mother and sister operated the Marbleton Hotel. On 23 March 1914 he recorded the H Lazy S brand, but did not renew in 1925.

"Farmers in this section are now cutting their grain. Those in the field at present are Hugo Swanstrom, C. W. Carlson, A. B. Stout, F. D. Ball, W. E. Spencer and the River Forks folk. But we must take our hats off to Hugo Swanstrom as the real farmer. Mr. Swanstrom has eighty-eight acres of as fine oats as anyone ever saw in this country, and the yield is estimated at thirty bushels per acre and forty-five pounds per bushel. We repeat again, that the right kind of people can farm grain successfully here, and that our land should be valued according to what it is capable of producing. Mr. Swanstrom has raised thoroly matured grain every year since he located under the Cottonwood Canal and his yields have always been satisfactory. (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs., Sep. 20, 1917).

Hugo registered for the World War I draft: Hugo Ferdinand Swanstrom, age 32, naturalized citizen, self-employed rancher at Marbleton, Wyoming.

Unfortunately, the Green River Supply Canal Project never resolved its organizational problems, and the Swanströms never proved their homestead claim.

About 1920 Hugo, his mother, and his brother Harry, moved to Rock Springs. Hugo went in with a friend of his and bought an automobile dealership, which was quite prosperous until the night his friend ran off with the cash and tools. The 1930 census shows him as a laborer, working in a garage. He owned his house at 311 Gail Street, which he reported as valued at $4,500. His mother was living with him.

He moved to California in the 1930s. He was listed on the 1934, 1942 and 1944 voter registration roll of Fresno as a Democrat. In 1934 he was a "garg." at 3632 McKenzie, and his mother was at the same address. In 1942 and 1944 he was a carpenter at 4604 Grant.

Hugo is remembered by his nieces and nephews as being very proper. 
Swanstrom, Hugo Frederick (I5)
 
233 His birth name was Johan Mårten Svanström. He was an accountant. He was three when he came to America with his parents and his four-year-old brother Hugo. They lived first at Rockford, Illinois and later at Chetek, Wisconsin. When he was 16 his father died. To relieve the financial burden on his mother, Martin went to live with his father's cousin in Burlingame, Kansas. He worked as a farm hand, but continued his schooling. The 1910 census shows him in his brother Hugo's household, working as a bookkeeper for the railroad. When he was about 18 his mother moved the rest of the family to Burlingame and they were reunited for a short time. When the family went to homestead in Wyoming, Martin stayed behind to finish high school and then, using money lent to him by his brother Hugo, he went on to become an accountant. Like his sisters, Martin anglicized his name: Martin John Swanström. This is the name that appears on his social security application, which also lists his place of birth as Chicago!

When World War I broke out Martin enlisted as a mechanic, and served in the Air Service in in France. While there he contracted a lung problem and was returned to America. The children of Martin's sister, Esther Porter, remember his leather pilot's helmet, with goggles and an olive drab wool knit cap for underneath. Martin had worn this helmet during World War I and then given it to his sister, who allowed her children to take turns wearing it to school on bitterly cold days. They all remember how much fun it was to wear it and how important they felt when it was their turn.

After a painfully slow recovery in an army convalescent hospital, Martin took a job as a claims investigator with the Erie Railroad. In 1920 and 1930 he was living in New York City. In 1920 he was living at 901 Ogden Avenue in the Bronx. He was a lodger in the household of James D. Clark, an undertaker. He reported that he was age 31, born in Illinois to a father born in Indiana and a mother born in Sweden. In 1930 he was living at 306 West 31st Avenue in Manhattan (Chelsea neighborhod, near Penn Station). He was a lodger in a hotel. He reported that he was age 41, born in Illinois to a father born in Indiana and a mother born in Sweden. Both censuses call him a clerk for Erie Railroad.

He later settled in Cleveland. In 1936 he was living at 1832 Crawford Road there. He was briefly married. He and his wife attempted unsuccessfully to adopt a child. His wife had a serious alcohol problem and they divorced.

When Martin retired in the early 1950s he went to live with his brother Hugo as they had always planned. This arrangement was very short lived. Martin moved to Reno, Nevada, and for the rest of his life enjoyed telling what an impossibly fussy and neat person Hugo was, and how the end of their living arrangement came when Hugo corrected him for putting the spoon that always sat on a shelf over stove with the handle turned the wrong way.

In 1954 Martin's niece, Betty Porter Borst, visited him in Reno and he took her on a tour of his favorite spots. This included a walk by the river to see a particular duck he kept his eye on, as well as some of the gambling spots. Martin himself did not drink or gamble, but had many friends who worked in these places and never sought to impose his views on others.

In 1955 he appears on a supplemental list of voters in Reno, Ward 3 (Nevada State Journal, June 1, 1955, p. 26, col. 8). He appears again in 1956 on a list of voters in Reno, Ward 3 (Nevada State Journal, May 23, 1956, p. 7A, col. 1).

In 1959 Martin was admitted to the Vetrans Hospital in Hot Springs, South Dakota. He was having complications from an old lung condition contracted during the war. He died in his sleep one night at the hospital. His brother Hugo and sister Hildur flew back for his funeral. His gravestone reads:

Martin J Swanstrom
South Dakota
Pvt Mech Sch Det
Air Service
World War I
July 19 1888
April 13 1959

His nephews and nieces remember him as a man who thoroughly enjoyed life. He had many friends and enjoyed light, happy conversation, always having a ready joke to make someone laugh. 
Swanstrom, Martin John (I6)
 
234 His birthdate is once given as 11 October. He and his wife came from Ed to Rafvenas, Ukna on 31 November 1879. They moved to Hannas on 19 October 1882 and later returned to Ukna, settling at Torp. They left Torp on 1 November 1884 and moved to Hammaren, Nathammar, Ukna. They left Ukna 26 October 1885 for Korshult, Gardserum, and moved away 14 November 1887. Svanström, Carl (I12325)
 
235 His date of birth is also given as 10 May 1888 (Samuelsson). Samuel Samuelsson and his family lived at Skärblacka in Ostergotland. Samuelsson, Samuel Valdemar (I1739)
 
236 His date of birth is also given as 17 October 1756. He was a farmer (bonde), with one-quarter ownership of Löckerum. The baptismal records of his children call him a yeoman (hemmansäg). There was a Johan Johansson born 17 October 1756 in Odensvi, and baptized 24 October. He was son of Johan Andersson in Hylinge. Johansson, Johan (I1821)
 
237 His father seems to have died when he was young. In 1900, when he was 7, he was living in the household of his step grandfather Alfred B. Boyle (64), grandmother Mary E. Boyle (45), uncle George Mc Donel (22), and uncle Virgil Mc Donel (20).

In 1910, he was single, living in the household of Samuel C. Rhodes (36), and Maggie Rhodes (34), and was listed as the son. Next door was Alfred B. Boyle (73), his wife Mary E. (58), and Alfred's step-son George McDanel (32).

In 1920, he was single, living in the household of step-father S. A. Rhodes (45) and mother Margaret Rhodes (44).

When he married Ellen Swanstrom, about 1930, he was a post office employee. According to his 1942 Social Security application, he worked for Montgomery Wards. 
Hinkle, Wilbur Andrew (I98)
 
238 His godparents were Lars Gardström, Karl Håkansson, Salomon Månsson of Svenserum, hustru Cajsa Larsdotter, Sarah Josephsdotter, and Cajsa Månsdotter of Torstorp.

He was a tailor. In 1815 he was a farmhand (dräng) at Hammarn in Gärdserum. From 1815 to 1819 he lived in the household of the tailor Magnus Nilsson, with whom he was apparently apprenticed. By 1828 this family was living at Landsberg under Broddebo, Gärdserum, and stayed there until his death in 1881. 
Svanström, Jonas (I119)
 
239 His great granddaughter Paola Landal wrote (29 March 2017):

"My grandmother Elsa Langdal was the youngest child of Edvard and Victoria Svanström and was born, as you found out, in Kalmar län, 1910, in a small town called Gamleby. When she was two years old the whole family moved to Stockholm on horse and cart. As you probably already know Sweden was extremely poor before industrialism, especially people in the countryside. Many people (around one million, 1/5 of the population) moved to the USA and also too capital cities in Sweden to avoid starvation. In Grandma´s family case however, I think Edvard and Victoria moved because they wanted a better life for themselves and their children. Not because they were starving in Gamleby,

"Edvard Svanström was a cobbler and in Stockholm he opened a shoemaker in the old town in Stockholm. They found a small apartment in the city and my grandmother described her childhood as happy. Her parents Edvard and Victoria were very kind people I guess, but as in most families, there was a great deal of sorrow and a life characterized by the cruelty of time.

"I was often listened to her stories about her brothers Filip and Tore. Unfortunately Tore died when he was only thirtyeight years old of pneumonia. Another brother, Henrik, choose to move back tot he countryside to work on a farm and lost contact with the family. But what really got me interested in their destiny was another brother who my grandmother never spoked about, until she got senile, at the age of 93. Then she suddenly started to talk about Birger, like we all knew him. Who is Birger I asked? 

It turned out that she had a brother who only was one year older than her. At this time it was a shame to have a mentally retarded person living at home and I guess that's why she never mentioned him. The most sad thing about this story is that Edvard and Victoria left Birger to a home for the disable. These homes were terrible for the kids and people who lived there at that time and he probably died soon after getting there.

"I have always wondered about Birger, if he really existed or just in her mind, and I am greatful that you found out that he did! That he was born 1909 in Gamleby, and died 1919 in Stockholm which was unknown for me until now. Poor Birger."

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Dr[äng] Frans Evald Svanström is shown leaving Ukna from Strömsborg to Törnsfall on 17 October 1883. He is shown arriving in Törnsfall from Ukna on 20 November 1883. 
Svanström, Frans Edvard (I1699)
 
240 His marriage date is also given as 10 October 1727. Persson, Sven (I1832)
 
241 His name also appears as Jonas Svensson Vårdstrand. He was Bailiff (Befallningsman or Betjänt) of Tyllinge for the Baron Sven Johan Duvall (born 1746), who was godfather to Jonas' son Sven. He and his wife disappear from the household rolls about 1800, when his place was taken by a new bailiff.

Jonas Svensson Wåhlstrand was bailiff (befallningsman or betjänt) for the Baron Sven Johan Duwall (1746-1819), a descendant of Jakob Duwall, who had an estate at Tyllinge in Dalhem. The Macdowalls of Makerston descend from Sir Dougal MacDowall, younger son of Sir Dougal, 2nd of Garthland. Of this line, Tobias Albert Macdowall of Makerston (abt 1541-1641) emigrated from Scotland to Mecklenburg, and much later, about 1594, settled in Sweden. In 1626 he was Baliff of Örbyhus and Tierp in Uppsala län. He died in 1641, nearly 100 years old, having outlived seven of his nine sons - all of whom were officers in the Swedish army. His son Jakob Albrektsson Duwall (1589-1634) had a distinguished military career and was posthumously created a Baron in 1674.

1/7/2017. Dan Ericsson has a family tradition the Wåhlstrands are descended from the Duwalls. He says "one of these ancestors which is Jonas Svensson Wåhlstrand born 1747 in Tyllinge/Dalhem. According to my grandfathers`s mother he was belived to be an illegitime son of Gustav Duvall at Tyllinge."

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

His name also appears as Jonas Svensson Vårdstrand. He was Bailiff (Befallningsman or Betjänt) of Tyllinge for the Baron Sven Johan Duvall (born 1746), who was godfather to Jonas' son Sven. He and his wife disappear from the household rolls about 1800, when his place was taken by a new bailiff.

-----

Jonas Svensson Wåhlstrand was bailiff (befallningsman or betjänt) for the Baron Sven Johan Duwall (1746-1819), a descendant of Jakob Duwall, who had an estate at Tyllinge in Dalhem. The Macdowalls of Makerston descend from Sir Dougal MacDowall, younger son of Sir Dougal, 2nd of Garthland. Of this line, Tobias Albert Macdowall of Makerston (abt 1541-1641) emigrated from Scotland to Mecklenburg, and much later, about 1594, settled in Sweden. In 1626 he was Baliff of Örbyhus and Tierp in Uppsala län. He died in 1641, nearly 100 years old, having outlived seven of his nine sons - all of whom were officers in the Swedish army. His son Jakob Albrektsson Duwall (1589-1634) had a distinguished military career and was posthumously created a Baron in 1674. 
Wåhlstrand, Jonas (I3115)
 
242 His name is also given as Daniel Linetz. Lind, Daniel (I4034)
 
243 His name was given as Johan Magnus in his christening record and as Jaen Magnus on the 1785-86 household roll. His birthdate is also given as 1779 (on the 1785-86 household rolls) and as 1 April 1781 (on the 1805-13 household rolls). His baptismal record confirms that the correct year was 1780. Jönsson, Johan Magnus (I4029)
 
244 His original name seems to have been John Raymond Sigman. He was a Cadillac Service Manager. Sigman, Raymond Leroy (I58)
 
245 Hustrun Christina???Andersdåtter ifrån Oxebo varit en gång gift i 53 åhr, haft 7. barn, dödde af lungsot och ålderdom xxx xxx. 78 år 1 mån. Hallingeberg C:5 (1772-1811) Bild 260 / sid 512 (AID: v38969.b260.s512, NAD: SE/VALA/00122) Andersdotter, Kjerstin (I3622)
 
246 In 1834 she left home and moved from Åtvid to Gärdserum. From 1834 to 1836 she worked as a maid at Torp Damvik in Gärdserum. From 1838-1840 and 1842- 1843 she worked as a maid in the household of Lars Larsson at Fivelsbo in Gärdserum. Svanström, Christina Charlotta (I711)
 
247 In 1867 he moved to Svederna, Tjustad where he worked as a farmhand. In 1869 he returned to live with his parents. He joined the army in 1871, and was assigned to the soldier's croft at Hyllela. He adopted the soldier's name Hylén.

After 1901 he was working for farmers and at last got a small pension from the Swedish government. He was noted as an ex-soldier and the owner of his (small) house.

After retirement, he worked at a tailor. He signed his letters Hylén Svanström. Iris (Porter) Legg had a man's coat made by him.

He died in 1925. He was then living at Strömsborg in Ekevik, but died at the hospital in Västervik.

(Swanson; Clerical Surveys: 1862-1867 Ukna (p. 94); 1867-1869 Ukna (p. 389); 1869-1871 Ukna (p. 94).) 
Hylén, Carl Oscar (I1698)
 
248 In 1868 Johan Svanström moved to Nalsebo, Ukna where he worked as a farmhand. In 1870 he returned to live with his parents. In 1871 he moved to Ekevik where he was a Worker, and in 1872 he moved to Dalhem, Kalmar.

[Clerical Surveys: 1862-1868 Ukna (p. 94); 1868-1870 Ukna (p. 168); 1870-1871 Ukna (p. 94); 1872 Ukna (p. 69).] 
Svanström, Johan August (I12)
 
249 In 1881 she moved to Lofta, with Carl Gustaf Jansson. Svanström, Alma Matilda (I2977)
 
250 in the influenza epidemic Hylén, Carl Oscar (I1698)
 

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