Notes


Matches 301 to 316 of 316

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301 Some sources say he was born in 1782. He was a cavalry soldier and grenadier. He served in Tjust Company of the Andra Livgrenadjärregementet, living at Börsebo in Gärdserum, and fought in the Napoleonic Wars.

His 1803 marriage record shows that he was a farmhand and his wife, already pregnant, was a maid. The 1803 christening record for his daughter Inga Lena shows his name as "Drängen Petter Jonsson," living at Hampen in Dalhem. The 1805 christening record for this son Peter Gustav shows his name as "Lif Grenadarien Petter Honnette." He appears as "Lif Gr. Peter Honnette" on the 1805-13 household roll of Gärdserum at #50 Halltorp (p. 106). The roll says he married his wife in 1803 and came to Gärdserum from Dalhem in 1804. He seems to have taken the name Honnett (Honette, Honneth) when he joined the army.

In 1805 he was sent to fight in the war against Napoléon, and never returned. The Swedish king Gustaf IV Adolf hated Napoléon, and hoped to sell Swedish assistance to the English and Russians against the French and Prussians. Pomerania, then part of the Swedish empire, was to be the base of operations. Sweden agreed to send 8,000 soldiers to reinforce its Stralsund garrison, and another 10,000 soldiers to Pomerania. Eleven hundred life grenadiers were ordered to Pomerania. They left Sweden on 11 September 1805. After sailing for six days, they reached Perth on 27 September. From Perth, they marched overland to Stralsund. In July 1806 the Prussians switched sides, but they were defeated by the French in October. The Swedes began to withdraw from the theatre. The regiment suffered heavy casualities, estimated at 1,050 men out of 1, 100. Some of the cavalry soldiers, like Peter Honnett, were captured in small groups, and taken to France beginning on 13 November 1807. The weather was bad, but by 1 January 1807 they had marched barely 1,500 kilometers. Some of men, probably including Peter Honnet were left behnd in Liepzig because of lassitude and chafed feet. They seem to have become prisoners of war in Russia. Those who went on to France largely survived and were able to return home after Napoléon gave orders for their release in 1809.

There is no record of his death. The clerical rolls at Gärdserum show that he was a prisoner of war (fång), probably in Russia. His widow remarried 1 December 1813.

There was an Anders Petter Honnett, born 13 June 1808 Gärdserum, son of Life Grenadier Anders Honett. He married Brita Cajsa Svensdotter, born 7 August 1813 O. Ryd. They moved 1841 from Dalhem to Gärdserum, where between 1837 and 1840 they have two workers and a maid. Children: Anna Brita, born 8 February 1837 Dalhem; Maria Carolina, born 27 June 1839 Dalhem; and Christina Mathilda, born 2 November 1841 Gärdserum. [Clerical Survey: 1837- 1840 Gardserum (p. 367).]

There was also a series of soldiers at Hallingeberg who used the name Honette. Carpenter-Worker Carl Johan Alfred Honnet, born 23 August 1842 at Hallingeberg. He came 30 November 1863 from Hallingeberg to Gamleby and married 19 December 1863 Ida Dorothea Jonsdotter, of Gamelby. They lived till hus at Heda, Klortorpet Croft, and had a daughter Maria Olivia, born 29 February 1864 at Gamleby. [Clerical Surveys: 1863-1864 Gamleby (p. 104).] 
Honnett, Peter (I60160)
 
302 Sven was born 1785-03-09 in Tyllinge, Dalhem.

He became Livgrenadjör (Grenadier) at the Kungliga Första Livgrenadjärregementet Kinds Company root Hökhult, Horn 1808-1839 (hence the name). Soldattorpet called Kåven. He died 1859-01-03 in Höckertsborg u Hökhult, Horn from chest fever. He was married to 1810-01-04 Elisabeth Charlotta Andersdtr born 1788-06-30 in Horn and d 1854-04-29 in Höckertsborg, Horn.

Jonas Fredrik's father is Anders Petter Svensson [Höckert] (born 1810 in Kåven, Höckhults estate, died in 1855 in Trossbonäs, Ekeby lands); see Horn AI: 1 p. 100 and AI: 2 p. 130th

Anders Petter's father was a soldier Sven Höckert, born 1785 9 / 3 in Dalhem sn, died 1858 in Höckersborg, Höckhults estate, the son of the bailiff Jonas Wåhlstrand and Lena Persdotter; his wife was Lisa Lotta Andersdotter, born 1788 30 / 6 in Horn's parish, whose mother Kerstin Emundsdotter died in 1845 in 28/11 Lögefall, Åbyboda parcels (bou). 
Höckert, Sven (I4898)
 
303 The 1880 census shows him as August Nelson (39), a gardener. The 1900 and 1910 censuses list him as a farmer, and say he came to America in 1869. Nelson, Nils August* (I1719)
 
304 The church register observed that he was ill with chest ailments for years. Cause of death: blood types. Jonsson, Karl Gustaf (I20054)
 
305 The name on her christening record is Maria Christina. She was listed as Maja Stina, with her mother but without her husband, at No. 49 in the west quarter of Västervik on the 1780-84 household roll. The 1805-13 clerical survey for Gärdserum calls her Maria Holmström in 1780. Her name was given as Maja Stina Holmström in the 1780-1785 christening records of her children, and as Maria Christina Holmström on the 1776-1784 communion roll for Västervik (p. 156, 177). Holmström, Maria Christina (I122)
 
306 There are immigration records for a Gustaf Svanström on 11 June 1880 and 8 July 1913.

In 1900 he was a day laborer living on [Herterrlist] Avenue in North Globeville. His household consisted of himself, G. A. Swanstrom (27), wife Mary (29), and step-children Neal W. Johnson (9), Clarence Johnson (8), and Ethel Johnson (5). The census says he had been in the U.S. seven years, and became a citizen in 1893.

He registered for the draft as Gustave Adolph Swanstrom on 12 September 1918. He was lived at Broomfield RFD in Adams County, working as a farmer, with a wife Mary E. Swanstrom. His physical description says he was tall with a slender build, and brown hair and blue eyes.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

There are immigration records for a Gustaf Svanström on 11 June 1880 and 8 July 1913.

In 1900 he was a day laborer living on [Herterrlist] Avenuu in North Globeville. His household consisted of himself, G. A. Swanstrom (27), wife Mary (29), and step-children Neal W. Johnson (9), Clarence Johnson (8), and Ethel Johnson (5). The census says he had been in the U.S. seven years, and became a citizen in 1893.

He registered for the draft as Gustave Adolph Swanstrom on 12 September 1918. He was lived at Broomfield RFD in Adams County, working as a farmer, with a wife Mary E. Swanstrom. His physical description says he was tall with a slender build, and brown hair and blue eyes. 
Svanström, Gustaf Adolf (I2981)
 
307 There were two men named Peter Hemmingson in Högsby at the same time. This Peter lived at Annaberg in Walahem Rote and was married to Stina Danielsdotter. The other Peter lived at Gamlehult and was married to Lena Danielsdotter. Hemmingsson, Peter (I663)
 
308 To begin with Axel Fredrik Höckert who was born in Horn in 1858. He was a merchandiser in fabrics and he was also a photographer. I know that my father has some photographs from him. I will show them for you as soon as he finds them. He met his wife Alma Catharina Andersson Bäckius in Järnboås, Nora. Järnboås is situated about 150 km north of Motala and about 220 km from Horn. So he probably met her when he was travelling selling fabrics. We think they lived in Nora for a couple of years and then came to Motala for the time when my grandfather was born. Hockert, Axel Fredrik (I20043)
 
309 Torpare
Dödsorsak: Reumatisk feber. 
Persson, Peter (I21124)
 
310 Torpare
Dödsorsak: Slag 
Persson, Jonas (I4200)
 
311 Torpare Arrendator
Dödsorsak: Lunginflamation. 
Karlsson, Alfred (I21135)
 
312 Utvandrat Nord Amerika 1880 från Gärdserum. Max, Selma Wilhelmina (I21146)
 
313 Utvandrat Nord Amerika 1882 från Gärdserum. Max, Gustava Charlotta (I21157)
 
314 Utvandrat till Nord Amerika som änka 1885 från Gädserum. Jonsdotter, Margareta Elisabet (I21151)
 
315 Varit Korpral vid Svea livgarde.
Dödsorsak: Slag. 
Scherman, Magnus (I21122)
 
316 Vivian (Luce) Swanstrom (1901-1979). She was a Registered Nurse. She was named Vivian for her grandmother Wilson's best friend. She was very short, 4'11." She had dark auburn hair, like her mother, and green eyes.

She attended Miss Wolcott School, an Episcopal finishing school in Denver, Colorado. Her subjects included French, needlework, art, music and elocution. About 1916 she was a debutante, but it now seems impossible to discover where or with what organization. During the 1880s, Cheyenne was regarded as the "wealthiest city per capita in the world" so any number of organizations could have organized debutante balls which carried over to the early part of this century. On the other hand, she might have come out under the sponsorship of the Central City Opera Company in Colorado.

In June 1918 she began studying music at the University of Wyoming in Laramie. She wanted to be an actress, but her parents forbade it. Her second choice of career was nursing, but her parents also opposed that. Her parents maneuvered her into four successive engagements with wealthy local boys, one a Hamilton and one Lloyd Alexander, but she broke each engagement.

Vivian left home in 1924, taking a stage coach from Big Piney via Opal to Rock Springs. In Rock Springs she boarded with Josephine Swanstrom at 311 Gale Street. She thought that the chances of becoming a nurse would be better if she could get a job, any job, in the hospital. She applied, hoping to get a job in the kitchen. The hospital was short of nurses and counter-offered with a training job, which she gladly accepted. In May 1927 she graduated from nurse's training at Rock Springs General Hospital.

On her graduation day, her childhood friend Harry Swanstrom surprised her by appearing in the audience. He had been in the army and just been released.

One of Vivian's prized possessions was her new DeSoto Roadster, a gift from her father. It was yellow with red wheels. In August, she took a day-trip to Rawlins with some friends in this car. The friends included her best-friend Mabel Eberle, Harry Swanstrom, and others. The friends dared Vivian and Harry to get married, which they did. They immediately decided to keep the marriage a secret until it could be annulled. Worried that someone might get suspicious, Harry spent the afternoon walking with Vivian's friend Mabel in the park. It was too late to return to Rock Springs, so they took a room in a local boarding house. Vivian and Mabel shared the room, while Harry slept downstairs on the couch. When they returned to Rock Springs the following day, they continued to live apart, but neither took steps to have the marriage annulled. By 1932 the Great Depression had begun. They were both having a hard time making ends meet. They met by chance on the street one day, started talking, and decided that the best thing to do would be to announce their marriage and move in together. This they did.

"Mrs. Swanstrom is planning on spending the holidays with her mother and brothers at Rock Springs" (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. Dec. 22, 1927).

"Mr. and Mrs. Harry Swanstrom went to Rock Springs Saturday. Mrs. Swanstrom will remain there for a visit, but Mr. Swanstrom returned. He is connected with the State Highway Department (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. Dec. 8, 1932).

"Miss Shirley Luce visited her sister Mrs. Harry Swanstrom last week. We are glad to report that Mrs. Swanstrom is much better now" (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. Nov. 15, 1934).

"Mr. and Mrs. Harry Swansstrom went to Fresno, California on Saturday to spend a short vacation with Mr. Swanstrom's sister Mrs. George Hinkle there. Mrs. Hinkle was Miss Ellen Swanstrom and taught in Sublette County a few years ago (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. Dec. 27, 1934).

"Mr. and Mrs. Harry Swanstrom left Daniel, Sunday to occupy their ranch at Farson" (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. Apr. 4, 1935).

"We were sorry to hear that Harry Swanstrom is suffering a broken leg and a sprained ankle" (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. Apr. 11, 1935).

"Friends have received cards announcing the birth of a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Harry Swanstrom at Farson on June 6th (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. June 18, 1936).

Vivian worked as a Registered Nurse and Director of Nurses for the hospital in Rock Springs for many years. Her husband died in 1957. In 1959 she resolved a long-standing confusion with the federal government, receiving a quit claim deed to 160 acres (the West one-half of the Northwest one-quarter and the North one-half of the Southwest one-quarter of Section 17 Township 25 North, Range 125 West).

She sold the farm about 1964 and moved to Rock Springs. About 1966 she went to work for the hospital in Rawlins, Wyoming, then retired about 1968, and took a trip of several months to Alaska. After retirement, Vivian lived with her daughter Betty Bigler in Heber, Utah. She died of diabetic cirrhosis there in 1979, and was buried beside her husband in Farson, Wyoming. She was an Episcopalian and a Republican.

Vivian Luce was a 7th cousin of her contemporary, Henry Robinson Luce, co-founder of Time-Life Publications. She was a 4th cousin of her less famous contemporary, Paul Mallory, manager of the White Horse Acres farm near Lexington, Kentucky, who foaled Seattle Slew (Violette). She was also a step second counsin of Mormon mystic Annalee Skarin, who was a granddaughter of William Adams Hickman.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

She was a Registered Nurse. She was named for her grandmother Wilson's best friend. She was very short, 4'11." She had dark auburn hair, like her mother, and green eyes.

She attended Miiss Wolcott School, an Episcopal finishing school in Denver, Colorado. Her subjects included French, needlework, art, music and elocution. About 1916 she was a debutante, but it now seems impossible to discover where or with what organization. During the 1880s, Cheyenne was regarded as the "wealthiest city per capita in the world" so any number of organizations could have organized debutante balls which carried over to the early part of this century. On the other hand, she might have come out under the sponsorship of the Central City Opera Company in Colorado.

In June 1918 she began studying music at the University of Wyoming in Laramie. She wanted to be an actress, but her parents forbade it. Her second choice of career was nursing, but her parents also opposed that. Her parents maneuvered her into four successive engagements with wealthy local boys, one a Hamilton and one Lloyd Alexander, but she broke each engagement. Vivian left home in 1924, taking a stage coach from Big Piney via Opal to Rock Springs. In Rock Springs she boarded with Josephine Swanstrom at 311 Gale Street. She thought that the chances of becoming a nurse would be better if she could get a job, any job, in the hospital. She applied, hoping to get a job in the kitchen. The hospital was short of nurses and counter-offered with a training job, which she gladly accepted. In May 1927 she graduated from nurse's training at Rock Springs General Hospital.

On her graduation day, her childhood friend Harry Swanstrom surprised her by appearing in the audience. He had been in the army and just been released.

One of Vivian's prized possessions was her new DeSoto Roadster, a gift from her father. It was yellow with red wheels. In August, she took a day-trip to Rawlins with some friends in this car. The friends included her best-friend Mabel Eberle, Harry Swanstrom, and others. The friends dared Vivian and Harry to get married, which they did. They immediately decided to keep the marriage a secret until it could be annulled. Worried that someone might get suspicious, Harry spent the afternoon walking with Vivian's friend Mabel in the park. It was too late to return to Rock Springs, so they took a room in a local boarding house. Vivian and Mabel shared the room, while Harry slept downstairs on the couch. When they returned to Rock Springs the following day, they continued to live apart, but neither took steps to have the marriage annulled. By 1932 the Great Depression had begun. They were both having a hard time making ends meet. They met by chance on the street one day, started talking, and decided that the best thing to do would be to announce their marriage and move in together. This they did.

"Mrs. Swanstrom is planning on spending the holidays with her mother and brothers at Rock Springs." (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. Dec. 22, 1927).

"Mr. and Mrs. Harry Swanstrom went to Rock Springs Saturday. Mrs. Swanstrom will remain there for a visit, but Mr. Swanstrom returned. He is connected with the State Highway Department. (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. Dec. 8, 1932).

"Miss Shirley Luce visited her sister Mrs. Harry Swanstrom last week. We are glad to report that Mrs. Swanstrom is much better now." (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. Nov. 15, 1934).

"Mr. and Mrs. Harry Swansstrom went to Fresno, California on Saturday to spend a short vacation with Mr. Swanstrom's sister Mrs. George Hinkle there. Mrs. Hinkle was Miss Ellen Swanstrom and taught in Sublette County a few years ago. (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. Dec. 27, 1934).

"Mr. and Mrs. Harry Swanstrom left Daniel, Sunday to occupy their ranch at Farson." (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. Apr. 4, 1935).

"We were sorry to hear that Harry Swanstrom is suffering a broken leg and a sprained ankle." (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. Apr. 11, 1935).

"Friends have received cards announcing the birth of a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Harry Swanstrom at Farson on June 6th. (Pinedale Roundup, Pinedale, Wyo., Thurs. June 18, 1936).

Vivian worked as a Registered Nurse and Director of Nurses for the hospital in Rock Springs for many years. Her husband died in 1957. In 1959 she resolved a long-standing confusion with the federal government, receiving a quit claim deed to 160 acres (the West one-half of the Northwest one-quarter and the North one-half of the Southwest one-quarter of Section 17 Township 25 North, Range 125 West).

She sold the farm about 1964 and moved to Rock Springs. About 1966 she went to work for the hospital in Rawlins, Wyoming, then retired about 1968, and took a trip of several months to Alaska. After retirement, Vivian lived with her daughter Betty Bigler in Heber, Utah. She died of diabetic cirrhosis there in 1979, and was buried beside her husband in Farson, Wyoming. She was an Episcopalian and a Republican.

Vivian Luce was a 7th cousin of her contemporary, Henry Robinson Luce, co-founder of Time-Life Publications. She was a 4th cousin of her less famous contemporary, Paul Mallory, manager of the White Horse Acres farm near Lexington, Kentucky, who foaled Seattle Slew (Violette). She was also a step second counsin of Mormon mystic Annalee Skarin, who was a granddaughter of William Adams Hickman. 
Luce, Vivian (I371)
 

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